IoT Evolution World Week in Review: Cambridge University, Qualcomm, Anheuser-Busch

We had our first snow here at IoT Evolution headquarters in Connecticut, so I’m going to bring it ice cold this week. We’ve been working hard to do some cool stuff for you in the last few days, including launching a new Industrial Internet of Things content channel, so make sure you check that out.

In the first of our lead stories this week, Cambridge University researchers have invented a near-infinite power supply for IoT devices, so if you want your IoT devices to last a billion years, you can use an AA battery, or just suck the leakage out of your transistors, according to a new paper in the journal Science.

And in more of the same old news as usual, apparently, a new study from security firm ForeScout based upon research by white hat hacker Samy Kamkar, it takes fewer than three minutes to hack many common Enterprise IoT devices. This in-depth analysis shows the dangers posed by enterprise IoT devices, and seems to reveal that most can act as points of entry into critical enterprise networks.

In a great guest post from Hagay Gellis, Regional Sales Manager, CEVA, we got a great rundown of the budding battle between the major connectivity standards that are all vying for dominance of the IoT.

And now, the news:
Consumers don’t trust the IoT, and now there’s some evidence other than the flat sales figures that shows it from IT security firm ESET and the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA), which have together released a survey that shows that half of Americans have such strong concerns about the security and privacy of connected devices and the Internet of Things (IoT) that they don’t want the devices at all.

Qualcomm Incorporated has announced that it will buy NXP Semiconductors through a subsidiary of Qualcomm that will make an offer to acquire all of the issued and outstanding common shares of NXP for $110.00 per share in cash, representing a total enterprise value of approximately $47 billion.

AT&T has switched on North America’s first LTE-M commercial site, in San Ramon, California, kicking off a growth pattern that will enable the evolution of the Internet of Things (IoT) for years.

Anheuser-Busch announced that it has fielded an automated big rig, controlled by software from Uber’s Otto, that this week successfully hauled a fully loaded trailer of Budweiser beer more than 120 miles on I-25 from Fort Collins, Colorado through Denver, to Colorado Springs.

Inmarsat, a provider of global mobile satellite communications, and Vodafone have announced a new roaming agreement designed to enable international satellite and cellular roaming connectivity for the Internet of Things (IoT) that the companies say will deliver greater reliability and reach than either has been able to offer previously.

This week on the IoT Time Podcast, I sat down with with Mikko Jarva, CTO, Intelligent Data, Comptel, to talk about data refinery, building a middle ground between the Edge and the Cloud, and Ken panders to you listeners both shamelessly and blatantly. This episode is sponsored by the IoT Evolution Expo. To become a sponsor of IoT Time, please email or tweet me.

There’s plenty more to read, listen to and watch, so visit us on IoT Evolution World for all the IoT news, my friends. Now is the time to put into your calendar the next IoT Evolution Expo, to be held in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Also, please get in touch with us when you have stories. As always, if you have questions, comments, complaints or compliments, please send them to me, editorial director Ken Briodagh at kbriodagh@tmcnet.com or on Twitter @KenBriodagh.